Tag Archives: population genetics

Wu and Watterson’s Theta*?

10 Feb

If you are doing population genetics, you probably heard of Watterson’s theta.
The paper where Watterson introduced theta is a classic. It is cited more that 3000 times.

Even if Watterson (1975) was a single-author paper, Watterson wasn’t working alone on this project. In the acknowledgments he says “I thank Mrs. M. Wu for help with the numerical work, and in particular for computing Table I.” In a similar situation in 2019, she would have likely gotten co-authorship on this paper and a PhD after a few papers. We would all have known the paper as Wu and Watterson (1975).

Screenshot 2019-02-10 16.04.53

I only know this story because a group of researchers from SF State and Brown University, including my amazing friend and office neighbor Dr Rori Rohlfs, did a study on “Acknowledged Programmers.”

Professor Margaret Wu

Margaret Wu was a programmer in the 70s, at a time when programming was often a job for women. She didn’t get authorship on Watterson (1975) and other papers she worked on, but much later, she did get a PhD and became a very successful professor.

If you would like to learn more about Margaret Wu, have a look at this insightful interview: http://genestogenomes.org/margaret-wu/.

Here is a video with her about the PISA rankings for countries’ educational systems: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Br93GTTnWr8 .

Paper and video on acknowledged programmers in theoretical population genetics

If you’d like to read more on acknowledged programmers in theoretical population genetics, have a look at the paper by Rori Rohlfs, Emilia Huerta-Sanchez and their students Samantha Dung, Andrea López, Ezequiel Lopez-Barragan, Rochelle-Jan Reyes, Ricky Thu, Edgar Castellanos and Francisca Catalan.

Plus!!! They made a really neat video about their project:

 

Here is a picture with most of the authors of the Genetics paper.

2018lab_3_orig

Authors of the paper in Genetics on Acknowledged Programmers: Illuminating Women’s Hidden Contribution to Historical Theoretical Population Genetics, Dung et al 2019.

 

* “Wu and Watterson’s Theta” was suggested by Tim Downing in a tweet.

Advertisements

Scientist spotlight : Jazlyn Mooney, PhD student UCLA

25 Jan

jazlynmooneyJazlyn Mooney grew up in Albuquerque New Mexico. She went to high school and college there too (Eldorado High School and University of New Mexico).

Sketching science created a lasting interest

I became interested in science in middle school. I had a science teacher, Mr. Pecknik, who made us draw everything we learned about (from central dogma to phylogenies) for class. So we kept a sketch book for our science class and I thought it was super cool.”

Not “cut out for MD/PhD” ?

Becoming a researcher didn’t always seem possible for Jazlyn. One summer, when she was an undergrad, she participated in an MD/PhD prep program. At the end of the summer, her summer advisor told her that she wasn’t cut out to be MD or PhD! Fortunately, she didn’t listen to him but instead listened to her other undergrad advisor, her family and herself and decided to continue her path to become a scientist! She did research as an undergraduate and then applied to PhD programs.

The history of Latin American populations

Jazlyn is now a PhD student at UCLA in the lab of Dr. Kirk Lohmueller and works to better understand the history of human populations using genetic data. She recently published a paper entitled: “Understanding the Hidden Complexity of Latin American Population Isolates.” In this paper she showed how Costa Rican and Columbian people are descended mostly from European males and Amerindian females, and a small number of African individuals.

The field that uses genetic data to understand the history of populations is called “population genetics”. Jazlyn got interested in population genetics when she was an undergrad and got an opportunity to do research with Dr Jeff Long.

Learning new things and presenting at meetings

Jazlyn loves learning new things and her favorite part of being a researcher is that it allows her to learn new things and create new knowledge. Jazlyn has presented her work at many conferences including : University of Chicago Research Forum, the meeting of the American Society for Human Genetics, the Bay Area Population Genomics meeting at UC Santa Cruz in 2018.

Links

Link to paper about the history of people in Costa Rica and Columbia

Link to a free “prepring” version of the same paper

Tacos, R and Twitter

Jazlyn’s favorite coding language: R

Jazlyn’s favorite food: Tacos

Jazlyn’s Twitter handle: @Jazlyn_Mooney